COURSE SYLLABUS
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND INTERNATIONAL LAW
NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY
School of Literature and Law
August 9-12, 2002
Shenyang, China

INSTRUCTOR:         Charles E. Rumbaugh, JD, CPCM

Email:                           ADROffice@Rumbaugh.net

 

SUGGESTED TEXT:             Schaffer, Richard; Earle, Beverley; Agusti, Filiberto. International Business Law And Its Environment. West Educational Publishing Company, 1999.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:   As global legal practice grows, lawyers increasingly face complex issues of professional responsibility involving multiple national jurisdictions, unfamiliar legal systems, clients with different concepts of legal representation, and professional climates based upon sharply differing ethical orientations, and expectations.  

COURSE OBJECTIVES: 

            PRIMARY OBJECTIVES…

 

  1. The relation between public administration and international law.
  2. The areas that is closely related to government in international law
  3. The relation between domestic and international law
  4. What can be done when international law contradicts with domestic law.
  5. The relation between international law and the local government.
  6. World Trade Organization’s “leash” on the practice of the local government.
  7. How to utilize international law and carry out activities that is beneficial to domestic government.

 

SECONDARY OBJECTIVES…

 

  1. Describe the benefits of an expanding global marketplace and economic interdependence for executive decision-making.
  2. Explain the three methods of International market-entry—

·        Trade

·        International Licensing of Technology and Intellectual Property

·        Foreign Investment

  1. Explain the various methods for International dispute resolution and their importance in executive decision-making in putting the deal together at the front-end and during/after contract performance.
  2. Describe the significant aspects of the international treaties/conventions have on the sale of goods, formation of contracts, contract remedies, international trade terms, and methods of financing to assure payment and performance of international obligations.
  3. Explain International and major trading countries rules on trade law and the role and benefits of GATT and the WTO membership for the executive.
  4. Define basic unfair international trade practices.
  5. Explain International marketing rules-of-the-road and the regulation and ethical issues associated with deciding how to conduct international business in an interdependent world.
  6. Describe the reasons and benefits of technology transfer agreements.
  7. Explain currency, trade, labor, environmental, taxation, and other risks/obligations in connection with executive decision-making for international businesses operating in a foreign environment.

ABSENTEE POLICY:

Attendance at each class session is essential and expected. Students with more than one absence will not receive a passing grade. Exceptions to this policy will be made only in special circumstances approved by the instructor. The dates shown for covering the text materials have been determined in advance, and the instructor reserves the right to change the schedule. Students will be informed of any changes in class.  If you miss class or are late to class, it is your responsibility to determine what has been missed, and if the schedule has been changed. If for some reason you are late for class, take your assigned seat without disturbing the class. Much material is covered in a class period, and most people can't afford to miss much class discussion.

GRADING POLICY:

Your class grade will be determined as follows: Attendance 10%, Participation 40%, and Final Written Paper, 50%.  The following point scale shall apply:

Cum Points    Assigned     Percent                                     Cum Points    Assigned     Percent

96-100 A                     96 – 100                              29-37               D+            29 - 37

88- 95 A-                    88 – 95                                    21-28               D            21 -28             

79-87   B+                   79 – 87                                    13-20               D-            13 - 20                        

71-78   B                      71 – 78                                      0-12               F            0 - 12  

62-70   B-                    62 – 70

54-61   C+                   54 – 61

46-53   C                     46 – 53

38-45   C-                    38 - 45

                                                                        

COURSE SCHEDULE

Session             Subject                         Chapter(s)                               Assignments

Day 1,              Intro to Int’l                         Read Chapters 1-3                PowerPoint Lecture,

Hours               Bus.                                                                             Chapters 1-3

1/2/3                                                                                       

Day 1,             Theory &                            Read Chapter 4                     PowerPoint Lecture,

Hours               Practice of                                                                  Chapter 4

4/5                   Dispute Resolution                                                        Arbitration As An Executive

Tool

                                                                                                            ADR Exercises

Day 1,              Int’l Contract                      Read Chapters 5-8                PowerPoint Lecture,

Hours               Formation/                                                                   Chapters 5-8

6/7                   Terms/Financing                                                            Exercises                                                                                                                                                               

Day 2,              Int’l & US                         Read Chapters 9-15              PowerPoint Lecture,

Hours               Trade Law                                                                 Chapters 9-15

1-7                                                                              

Day 3,              Regulation of                      Read Chapters 16-23                    PowerPoint Lecture,

Hours               Int’l Market-                           Open Question/Discussion            Chapters 16-23

1-7                   place                            on various decision-

                                                            making characteristics

                                                            international executives

                                                                                                           

  “NEGOTIATION EXERCISES”

 

Students will spend time throughout the course doing individual/group exercises that emphasize the “difficult” role of executive decision-making with the focus on the methods/techniques in the optional textbook, Getting to Yes.  In particular the interplay of the substantive topics and avoidance of litigation, creating options that avoid conflict, equalizing of negotiating positions, and the use of various forms of alternative dispute resolution methods are emphasized in these exercises.

 

FINAL WRITTEN PAPER:

 

The Final Written Paper for this course must be prepared in English (or alternatively, in Chinese), be double-spaced (approximately 300 words per page), and prepared in Microsoft Word Format, preferably using 12 point font, “Times New Roman” or “Arial” script and copied onto an IBM-formatted High Density Diskette.  The paper should deal with an important aspect of international trade from the perspective of the student as a learning process.

 

Students are expected to prepare this paper at the highest possible level of learning, in keeping with the fact the course is graduate level.  Papers which reflect “application” and “analysis” will be considered to meet this requirement. According to “Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives” (1956), “Application” means the use of previously learned information in new and concrete situations to solve problems that have single or best answers.  At this level, the student acts; administers; articulates; assesses; charts; collects; computes; constructs; contributes; controls; determines; develops; discovers; establishes; extends; implements; includes; informs; instructs; operationalizes; participates; predicts; prepares; preserves; produces; projects; provides; records; relates; reports; shows; solves; takes; teaches; transfers; uses; utilizes.  Bloom defined “Analysis” as the breaking down of informational materials into their component parts, examining (and trying to understand the organizational structure of) such information to develop divergent conclusions by identifying motives or causes, making inferences, and/or finding evidence to support generalizations.  At this level, the student breaks down; correlates; diagrams; differentiates; discriminates; distinguishes; focuses; illustrates; infers; limits; outlines; points out; prioritizes; recognizes; separates; subdivides.

 

Students will complete their individual course paper and combine it with papers from all the other 14 papers for courses in the MBA program and then submit the papers on a diskette (along with two “hard-copies”) to IVY University in Alhambra, California.

 

Students are encouraged to focus their papers around the organization where they are currently employed, an organization they have been employed with previously, a new business venture they are contemplating, or an organization with which they are familiar. Students should attempt to relate course principles to the actual situation existing in the “focus” or “target” organization.  Students without a “focus” or “target” company are encouraged to prepare papers which reflect the student ability to demonstrate a thorough understanding of the business management discipline in the paper.

 

Students preparing their papers around a “focus” or “target” organization will need to play a “role” during the research for and development of their papers.  Each student should assume the role of the General Manager of the organization/business firm/company he/she has chosen as his “target” or “focus”.

 

Tables and figures, charts, and graphs (if any) should be prepared using Excel or a similar program.  The report should be checked with a spell-checker and grammar checker (part of MS Word, etc).  The preferred format is to justify the left margin only. Use double- spacing which makes it easier for the instructor to read and award you a higher grade. The quality of report should be similar to a presentation you would make to senior management. Prepare the report as though your job depended on it (your final grade does!).  The final written paper should be approximately 15 pages. The first page shall be an EXECUTIVE SUMMARY which includes your conclusions, forecasts, and recommendations. The rest of the report should give support to your Executive Summary. Charts, tables, further analysis, references etc. can be set up in appendices.

                                                           

                                                                       

BIBLIOGRAPHY

In addition to the many internet addresses in vu-graphs and texts, the following are provided so the student can supplement the subject matter knowledge gained from the course

 

 

August, Ray INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS LAW Prentice Hall Englewood Cliffs, NJ 1993

 

Ball, Donald A. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS: THE CHALLENGE OF GLOBAL COMPETITION Irwin Chicago 1996

 

Bartlett, Christopher MANAGING ACROSS BORDERS Harvard Business School, Boston 1989

 

Brady, Neil F. (Ed) ETHICAL UNIVERSALS IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Springer New York 1996

 

Cateora, Philip R. INTERNATIONAL MARKETING Irwin Homewood, IL 1993

 

Catlin, Linda B. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS South-Western Cincinnati, OH 1994

 

Charkham, Jonathan KEEPING GOOD COMPANY Oxford University, New York 1994

 

Costa, Janeen Arnold; Bamossy, Gary J. (eds) MARKETING IN A MULTICULTURAL WORLD Sage Thousand Oaks, CA 1995

 

Crainer, Stuart, Ultimate Business Library: 50 Books That Shaped Management . New York: AMACOM, 1997.

 

Cronin, Kevin (ed) NATIONAL BOOK OF LISTS, 1992 Local Knowledge San Ramon, CA 1992

 

Culpan, Refik, (ed) MULTINATIONAL STRATEGIC ALLIANCES International Business New York 1993

 

Czinkota, Michael GLOBAL MARKETING IMPERATIVE NTC Business Lincolnwood, IL 1995

 

Czinkota, Michael R. GLOBAL MARKETING IMPERATIVE NTC Business Lincolnwood, IL 1995

Czinkota, Michael R. INTERNATIONAL MARKETING Dryden Forth Worth 1993

 

Daniels, John D. INTERNATIONAL DIMENSIONS OF CONTEMPORARY BUSINESS PWS-Kent Boston, MA 1992

 

Dixon, J. Robb. New Performance Challenge: Measuring Operations for World-Class Competition . Homewood IL: Dow Jones-Irwin, 1990.

 

Deming, W. Edwards.  Out of the Crisis . Cambridge, MA: MIT, 1986.

 

Dressler, G. Management: Leading people and Organizations in the 21st century .  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1998.

 

Eiteman, David K.; Stonehill, Arthur MULTINATIONAL BUSINESS FINANCE Addison-Wesley Reading, MA 1979

 

Fisher, Roger. Getting Ready to Negotiate: The Getting to Yes Workbook . New York:  Penguin Books, 1995.

 

Grosse, Robert INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Irwin Chicago, IL 1995

 

Gutterman, Alan S. LAW OF DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL STRATEGIC ALLIANCES Quorum Westport, Conn 1995

 

Hall, Edward T. HIDDEN DIFFERENCES: DOING BUSINESS WITH THE JAPANESE Anchor Garden City, NY 1987

 

Harris, Philip R.; Moran, Robert T. MANAGING CULTURAL DIFFERENCES Gulf Houston 1991

 

Hirsch, William J. The Contracts Management Deskbook . New York:  AMACOM, 1983.

 

Hoffman, W. Michael Hoffman and Frederick, Robert E. Business Ethics (3rd ed).R.R. Donnelley & Sons Company, 1995

 

Jain, Subhash C. MARKET EVOLUTION IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES International Business, New York 1993

 

Jennings, Marianne BUSINESS: ITS LEGAL, ETHICAL AND GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT (4th ed) South-Western College Publishing, Cincinnati, Ohio 1997

 

Kaynak, Erdener GLOBAL BUSINESS IBP New York 1993

 

Kaynak, Erdener; Ghauri, Pervez N. (eds) EUROMARKETING IBP New York 1994

 

Kenna, Peggy BUSINESS CHINA Passport Lincolnwood, IL 1994

 

Kenna, Peggy BUSINESS GERMANY Passport Lincolnwood, IL 1994

 

Kenna, Peggy BUSINESS ITALY Passport Lincolnwood, IL 1995

 

Kenna, Peggy BUSINESS MEXICO Passport Lincolnwood, IL 1994

 

Kenna, Peggy BUSINESS FRANCE Passport Lincolnwood, IL 1994

 

Kenna, Peggy BUSINESS SPAIN Passport Lincolnwood, IL 1995

 

Kenna, Peggy BUSINESS U.K.: A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO UNDERSTANDING BRITISH BUSINESS CULTURE Passport Books Lincolnwood, IL 1995

 

Kenna, Peggy BUSINESS JAPAN Passport Lincolnwood, IL 1994

 

Korda, Michael. Power!  How to Get It, and How to Use It.  New York:  Random House, 1995

 

Litka, Michael P. INTERNATIONAL DIMENSIONS OF THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS South-Western Cincinnati, OH 1995

 

Logothetis, N. Managing for Total Quality from Deming to Taguchi and SPC. New York: Prentice Hall, 1992.

 

Morrison, Terri INTERNATIONAL TRAVELER'S GUIDE TO DOING BUSINESS IN LATIN AMERICA Macmillan Spectrum New York 1997

 

Nierenberg, Gerard I. (1973). Fundamentals of Negotiating. New York:  Hawthorn/Dutton.

 

Punnett, Betty Jane INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PWS-Kent Boston 1992

 

Pitts, Joe W. (ed) NAFTA HANDBOOK: A PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR DOING BUSINESS UNDER NAFTA CCH Incorporated Chicago, IL 1994

 

Pun1 Czinkota, Michael R.; Rivoli, Pietra; Ronkainen, Ilkka A. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Dryden Forth Worth, TX 1992

 

Seelye, H. Ned CULTURE CLASH: MANAGING IN A MULTICULTURAL WORLD NTC Business Books Lincolnwood, IL 1995

 

Stoner, James A.F., R. Edward Freeman, and Daniel R. Gilbert, Jr.  Management . Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, Prentice Hall, 1995.